Babcock recognizes the importance of mentorship at the WiDS Professional Development Series

On April 9th, Babcock attended the Women in Defence and Security (WiDS) Annual Speed Mentoring Series. The event is designed to provide professional and personal development opportunities to both mentors and mentees in Canada’s defence and security industry. Babcock’s Jake Jacobson, Vice President, and Catherine O’Reilly, VP of Human Resources were on hand to act as industry mentors. Also in attendance as mentees were five Babcock employees from the Ottawa office.

Learning from Industry Leaders

The WiDS Speed Mentoring Series took place at the Jean Piggott Hall inside Ottawa’s City Hall. Tables were set up around the room with one mentor per 1-2 mentees. Mentees were given 15 minutes with a mentor to discuss, and request advice and other insight. When the 15 minutes was up, mentees would rotate to the next table to interact with a different mentor. Each mentee had the opportunity to interact with 7 mentors during the course of the speed mentoring sessions.

With over 50 exceptional industry leaders as mentors in attendance, mentees were offered an abundance of high quality advice and guidance. These discussions were beneficial to mentees at all stages of their careers. A wide range of topics was discussed, such as being a woman in the defence and security industry, having a voice in your company, developing and maintaining confidence in your career, finding your path, interacting with colleagues, and much more.

When the mentoring sessions came to an end, the floor opened up to a reception, where mentors and mentees could mingle more informally. Mentees introduced their new mentors to colleagues, and shared the knowledge and advice they acquired from each other.

Babcock Values Mentorship

The landscape of mentorship continues to change as young people become increasingly well educated when they enter the workforce. Today, mentorship is a mutually beneficial experience, allowing the mentee to learn from the mentor’s experience, and the mentor to learn from the mentee’s new perspectives and ideas.

Although mentorship requires effort from both mentors and mentees, the outcome of these relationships is rewarding for both members. While mentors have the opportunity to give back and re-energize their career, mentees are able to gain self-confidence, enhance interpersonal skills, and develop their careers. Both parties are able to learn different perspectives, which is an important aspect of growth, as this allows people to learn to take on different mindsets when faced with challenges.

Learn more about WiDS: https://www.wids.ca/